Want to Have Your 15 Seconds of Art?

Photography by Ali Pica

Are you an artist of some kind (photographer, sculptor, painter, metal artisan, jeweler) and looking to promote yourself? Want to have your 15 seconds of art? Let us showcase your work on our site! We are looking for artists to submit their art and a brief bio about their work, upcoming events, and any other info we should know. We will post your work and bio on our site, Facebook page, and Instagram page

For submissions or questions, fill out the form below, contact me at adawnpica.ttw@gmail.com, or message us on Facebook or Instagram.

We look forward to hearing from you.

A. Dawn


15 Seconds of Art: Melissa Short’s Interstellar Adventure

Melissa Short

Melissa Short’s upcoming art exhibition is beyond the stars! According to Short, “T H E  P L A N E T S” is a seven part series of paintings that follows Gustav Holst’s orchestral suite, “The Planets, Op. 32.” This orchestral suite corresponds to the solar system. The concept of the work is astrological rather than astronomical, which is why Earth is not included. Each piece is intended to convey ideas and emotions associated with the influence of the planets on the psyche, which she titled the following:

I. Mars – The Bringer of War

II. Venus – The Bringer of Peace

III. Mercury – The Winged Messenger

IV. Jupiter – The Bringer of Jollity

V. Saturn – The Bringer of Old Age

VI. Uranus – The Magician

VII. Neptune – The Mystic

You can see a preview of Melissa’s work on our Instagram page: thirtythirdwheel

You can see Melissa’s exhibit “T H E  P L A N E T S” at The Library Express Bookstore on Friday January 5, 6 p.m.-8 p.m.  located at 300 Lackawanna Ave, Scranton PA, 18503.


A Stand Up Guy


It happened in college.

That’s when Zack Hammond decided he needed to be a comedian. He experienced comedian Christopher Titus’s “Norman Rockwell Is Bleeding”—a comedy appearance treating his dysfunctional family, and Zack decided comedy could be a way for him to better cope with the dysfunctions in his own life.

A Comedian Is Born

Zack began attending all of the open mic nights he could. When he turned twenty-one, he signed up to perform at Wise Crackers (when it used to be at the Clarion in Scranton), and he shares that “it sucked.” The host announcing it was his first night to perform probably didn’t help. The guy that heckled him for being an English major probably didn’t either. Still, Zack made it through the tough Pennsylvania crowd, figuring he had to keep at it in order to be better.

Zack’s got a list of comedians who’ve influenced him to keep trying ranging from George Carlin to Richard Pryor to Patton Oswalt and Doug Stanhope, who Zack opened for in Scranton earlier this year. There are writers he encountered in his English major days that move him, too—Hemingway, Joyce, Milton, and the more contemporary David Foster Wallace, who Zack really seems to admire. He likes that the author is “clever and smart” and adds that the asides in his writing translate to comedy easily. With society heading down a sad path of stupidity, Zack is grateful for his English background that got him not only reading, but writing, too. In the recent Creative Writing Conference hosted by King’s College in Wilkes-Barre, Zack shared with students that his career in writing isn’t just about jokes and being funny, but that the literary techniques of foreshadowing, plot and structure are crucial to not just setting up a good joke, but being able to carry them through a successful comedic act as a vehicle as well. You’ve got to have these to keep audiences interested, and more importantly, laughing. “Comedy has limits, unless it’s good,” he shares. Structure and mechanics of writing are clearly what helps make the comedy last.

I asked Zack about inspiration for new material. He says there isn’t anything like that. He just takes things he notices (that often annoy him) and he tries to comment on them in a way that will be funny. He adds some advice from Carlin—the idea that you have to divorce yourself from society. Zack echoes the truth in this concept. Good comedians need to put anything and everything on the table as potential material—even themselves. He writing isn’t only about the mechanics of it, but working on the analysis of material, too, including self-awareness.

Zack’s tried other creative writing with screenwriting, skits and sketches, but isn’t a big fan of writing these out, as visualizations of an idea are sometimes easier to just explain. He isn’t interested in writing comedy for others to perform either as it can be frustrating for his vision to take the form he wants through the actions of others who might interpret things in unintended ways or just disregard his direction all together. Plus, long-form comedic writing is a big commitment, and shorter forms are more Zack’s style. He believes it’s more exciting when it’s you performing and you get to see firsthand how successful the comedy has been received.

But writing comedy is challenging, to be sure. Zack shares that it’s not like performing music where you can hear it when you practice it to make adjustments or corrections. “With comedy, you don’t know it’s funny until someone laughs at it,” he confides. Then, editing can take place to see if a bit is too wordy or if there’s a better way to get an idea across. He adds, “You have no idea how much gas [a bit] has until you test it out.” You have to learn how to proofread onstage to fix it offstage for the next show.

Some Sage Advice

I questioned Zack about what advice he had for aspiring comedians who want to get on stage. He said simply, “Don’t.” I’m fairly sure he was joking, But it leads to the advice he has to give. One, be motivated—nose to the grindstone, full-out hard work will be what gets you the big payoff. Two, “Be yourself 100%.” You can’t rely only on imitation or emulation and feeding off of others. You must “bear your soul” and “suffer and such for a very long time” until –hopefully—things click into place. He adds that becoming a comedian is a “very long road of highs and very depressing lows. You question yourself all the time and have moments of doubt where you wonder why you ever thought it was a good idea. You have to be passionate and crazy to do it.”

You can find Zack Hammond (to follow him around like a groupie) on Facebook ( Zack Hammond: Comedian) or find him at the following upcoming shows, several of which he’s hosting or head lining:

December 22: Stroudsburg, PA @ The Sherman Theater at 8 p.m.
December 28: Binghamton, NY @ Peterson’s Tavern at 8:30 p.m.
December 29: Erie, PA @ The Harlequin Ballroom at 8:30 p.m.
December 30: Hershey, PA @ The Vineyard at Hershey at 8 p.m.
January 12-13: Wilkes-Barre, PA @ Wise Crackers at Mohegan Sun Casino at 9 p.m.
And hunt down his albums online: Sorrow Tree, Appalling and Utilitarian.

A Little Diva Holiday Show


A Little Diva Holiday Show: One-Acts for Children & Teens

Diva Theater Productions
Olde Brick Theatre
Providence Section, Scranton

The youngsters at the Olde Brick Theatre have quite the holiday spectacular planned this year. Their upcoming performance, A Little Diva Holiday Show: One-Acts for Children & Teens features four one-act plays by local playwrights.

First is “The Shortest Day” by local actress Lorrie Loughney. She shares that her play helps audience members (and the kids especially) to learn about the Christmas traditions we have today. Shannon O’Malley, one of the young performers, says the best part of being in this Celtic Christmas fairytale is working with new people and getting to see the play come together. This echoes the one-act’s director, Sandra Connolly, who claims the best part of this performance experience has been helping the young actors better understand how theatre works and letting the kids learn how to express themselves in character.

Connolly also directs “The Kid Who Hates Christmas” by Margo and Marnie Azzarelli. Marnie Azzarelli hopes that audiences recognize it is important to spend time with family at Christmas while you still have them with you. This mother-daughter writing team is passionate about history and family and their play has both, according to Marnie. Margo hopes people will come to the youth performance not only to support local arts, but for the opportunity to support our future actors and actresses, too. She says, “There may be a future Meryl Streep in the cast”—perhaps it’s one of the young actresses in their play.

Ted LoRusso’s “The Threes of Throop” is also running in this performance set. Mia Scotti, an actress in this Christmas elegy, feels LoRusso’s one-act has great detail and that it’s fun to play a real-life character, as the play is based on a portion of the childhood of Lou Bisignani of Actor’s Circle fame. LoRusso and director, Laura M. Heffron, both feel that the kids are rising to the occasion and challenging themselves and their imaginations. Heffron adds that everyone is wearing many hats to make this production happen, too, and that the collaboration taking place throughout all aspects of the performance is phenomenal, and the youth are embracing it.

Heffron is also directing “Mother’s Little Elfer” by Wendy Wescott. The large cast of this play had a great deal to share about it, most agreeing that they thought it was funny, but people could learn a lesson from it as well. It’s relatable, they say, too, because nearly everyone has an Elf on the Shelf to keep them in line.

A Little Diva Holiday Show: One-Acts for Children & Teens runs December 7, 8, and 9 at 7:30 p.m. and December 10 at 2:00 p.m. Seating is limited, but you can reserve your seats by calling Diva Theater Productions at 570-209-7766.


Man on a Canvas


Diva Theater Productions is pleased to present local playwright Jeff Boam’s Man on a Canvas at the Old Brick Theater in Scranton. It opens on Friday, November 10.

When talking with the cast, they unanimously agreed that Boam’s play is singular.  Set in 1920’s New York at the Algonquin Hotel where members of the famous “Vicious Circle” met (think Dorothy Parker, Harpo Marx, Alexander Woollcott and the gang), the play moves forward to modern-day Scranton, Pennsylvania, where the story of boxing and boxers who won’t fight continues.  Actor David Spitzer feels the actors’ portrayals of historic personages helps add to the uniqueness of the show.  Actor Michael Madajeski jokes that all of the drinking the Algonquin Round Table members did makes the play, but his humor fits in, particularly since actor Dante Giammarco feels one of the best parts of the rehearsal process for the show has been getting the chance to watch Boam’s comedy develop in his fellow actors.  He confesses it leads to some “delicious” moments on stage.

If that’s not incentive enough to go, maybe Boam’s boxing theme will pull you in.  The production, which began as a screenplay that Boam admits he “forced anybody with a pair of eyes” to read, has his hard work and determination pay off in play form.  Director Paige Balitski was happy to take on the show, which follows other productions of Boam’s at the Old Brick including Behind The Six and The Judas Sheep.  But boxing is in Scranton’s blood.  Boam even consulted with the city’s own “Irish” Gene Reed when writing to make the boxing aspects as believable as possible.  Boam shares, as well, that the comedy would appeal to fans of plays like The Man Who Came to Dinner and You Can’t Take It With You; it is in true Kaufman and Hart style.

So come for the history and boxing and stay for the good time.  Man on a Canvas runs November 10, 11, 17, and 18 at 8 p.m. and November 12 and 19 at 2 p.m.  For ticket reservations, contact Diva Theater Productions at 570-209-7766

The Birds


The Birds

Diva Theater Productions

Olde Brick Theatre

Providence Section, Scranton


It’s that time of year when people flock to anything spooky. This October should be no different, as all of NEPA ought to be flying to see the Diva Theater’s production of The Birds. Based on the Daphne du Maurier short story, the play version of The Birds will appeal to any lover of the story or of Alfred Hitchcock’s movie of the same name. But be warned—no version, whether play or movie—is just like her story. Each has its own personality and its own thematic outlook.


I spoke with Paul J. Gallo, director of the Diva Theater’s version, and asked why people ought to come out to see the performance. He said just that:  “It’s its own piece of work. There are birds and there are dire straits, and while it seems like man versus nature on the surface, it’s really [a story of] man versus himself.” He suggests that this is the key to the play version. In his work, playwright Conor McPherson gets to delve more deeply into how humans survive when everything in the world is out of sorts.


Gallo is pleased to be putting on a show that’s not been seen in Northeastern Pennsylvania. That makes him pleased for his cast and crew as well who are working hard to give the area theatre in its best form—something “organic that has a life of its own.” The actress playing Julia, Lindsey Matylewicz, echoes this idea. When asked about the biggest challenge she’s faced with this show, she smiles and says that as her first dramatic work (as opposed to prior comedic roles), The Birds has been a test for her as she’s had to work hard “rounding out her character and her motives.”  Additionally, he feels that the work gives its actors the challenge of the larger messages it has to share about humanity, that the play goes well with the time of year, and it gives the crew the creative task of how to build up the threat of birds inside of a theatre.


Speaking with Jennifer Frey, who plays the authoress Diana in the production, gives insight into the real machinations of the work.  She says, “as in any good dystopian story, there are internal and external monsters.” Gallo mirrors this sentiment, adding, “The terror of the play comes from the characters themselves,” and states that working up the tension of the characters trapped inside because of the birds is a challenge, too. While the movie focuses on the fear of the birds and their attacks, the play looks at how horror comes from within us all.


The Birds runs October 6, 7, 13, and 14 at 8 p.m. and the Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. will be held on October 8 and October 15. Reservations are strongly suggested. You can contact Diva Theater -Productions at 570-209-7766.